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Will children be more affected in Covid third wave?

June 12, 2021 - 8:25pm
There appears to be no substantial evidence to suggest that children will be more affected or have greater illness severity due to COVID-19 in the anticipated third wave, according to a new report. The Lancet COVID-19 Commission India Task Force prepared the report after convening an experts group comprising leading paediatricians from the country to examine the issue of 'paediatric COVID-19' in India. It said the infection's symptomatology in children in India appears to be globally comparable. "Most children with COVID-19 are asymptomatic, and amongst those symptomatic mild infections are predominant. Most children have fever with respiratory symptoms, and often present with gastrointestinal symptoms (such as diarrhea, vomiting, pain in abdomen) and atypical manifestation compared to adults. The proportion of symptomatic children increases as age increases as does the severity in such age groups," the report stated. In the absence of a national database on clinical presentation and outcomes of infected children during the two surges noted thus far, the data of approximately 2,600 hospitalised children, below the age of 10 years (excluding neonates), from 10 hospitals (both public and private), in Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Maharashtra and Delhi-NCR region, was collected and analysed. According to the data, mortality rates amongst these surveyed hospitalised COVID-19 positive children below the age of 10 years was 2.4 per cent and about 40 per cent of the children who died had comorbidities. "Nine per cent of all hospitalised COVID-19 positive children presented with severe illness, under 10 years of age. The above observations were similar during the two surges of COVID-19 infections India has experienced," the Lancet document said. Three doctors from AIIMS, namely Sheffali Gulati, Sushil K Kabra and Rakesh Lodha, contributed to the study. Kabra said less than 5 per cent children will require hospital admission in COVID-19 and out of them the mortality is of 2 per cent. "Say out of 1 lakh, 500 children get hospitalised and 2 per cent of deaths are reported among them. So in one lakh, mortality of just one or two children is seen. In children, as such the disease is less severe. Very low proportion requires hospitalisation and very small proportion of mortality is reported. The mortality is also contributed by underlying diseases in the form of comorbidities like diabetes, cancer, anemia or severe malnutrition. In normal children, mortality is extremely rare," he told . The data was also evaluated separately for the time periods corresponding to the two surges, March 2020-December 2020 and January 2021-April 2021. Comparable observations were recorded in a multicentric study which examined 402 children hospitalised in Indian hospitals, of which 90 per cent were asymptomatic to mildly symptomatic, and of 318 cases wherein 44 per cent had underlying co-morbidities, it said. "Based on the data available, there appears to be no substantial evidence to suggest that children would be more affected or would have greater illness severity due to COVID-19 infection in the anticipated third wave. Studies also indicate that children have milder disease, better prognosis, and low mortality in comparison to adults," it said. On multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) in children, the report said, risk factors for this condition include obesity, asthma, compromised breathing, developmental disorders, cardiac disease, cancers or immunocompromised children as well as those who have undergone surgeries. Although figures indicate low mortality rates from acute COVID-19 in older teens, it appears to be higher in those who are obese. Most published data suggest mild to moderate predisposition in most cases and low mortality linked with MIS-C. "Preliminary review of cases within representative facilities further corroborates the low case severity and low overall mortality rates in children. That said, the health system needs to gear up for a paediatric case load with adequate infrastructure, earmarked facilities at primary, secondary and tertiary levels of care, oxygen availability, appropriate equipment, trained manpower, drugs and injectables among others, all of which are specific to children," the report said. The national-level clinical protocols must be adhered to at all levels of facilities and all providers adequately trained, similar to adult protocols. "The health system must maintain its routine programs like immunisation and nutrition and identify high risk patients in advance for better management. Vaccines will form an important part of the preventive strategy for adults and also eventually for children and this must be evaluated and implemented expeditiously. "Behaviour change communication and media management must be prioritised to help alleviate panic and anxiety. Schools must be reopened cautiously in person, with options for online access as needed, but with a firm resolve to bring normalcy back as quickly as possible in children's lives," the report added.
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IMA to hold countrywide protest on June 18

June 12, 2021 - 8:25pm
The Indian Medical Association will hold a protest on June 18 against assault on doctors, with the slogan of 'save the saviours'. In a statement, the apex medical body asked all its state and local branches across the country to observe the protest by wearing black badges, masks, ribbons, shirts and running awareness campaign against violence targeting healthcare professionals. The IMA said press conferences will also be organised and they will also meet local NGOs and voluntary service leaders. It termed "extremely disturbing" a series of violence against doctors in the last two weeks in Assam, Bihar, West Bengal, Delhi, Uttar Pradesh, Karnataka and other places. It demanded the implementation of central hospital and Health Care Professionals Protection Act with IPC and Code of Criminal Procedure (CrPC), standardisation and augmentation of security in each hospital, and declaring hospitals as protected zones among others. "Action Committee of IMA, after considering all the aspects and to express our concern, anger and solidarity, has decided to observe the 18th June 2021 as IMA National Protest Day with demand to stop assault on the profession and the professionals with the slogan 'Save the Saviors'," the medical body said. It further said that June 15 will be observed as a National Demand Day and Press Meets will held across the country by branches. On yoga guru Ramdev's alleged recent disparaging remarks against allopathy, the IMA said the legal course is underway and it will be followed up. "Ramdev has now publicly issued the new statement saying that 'DOCTROS ARE DEVDOOTS' and he will personally also go for vaccination. But the mental agony/verbal violence inflected on us, is unforgettable," it said.
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UK-EU Brexit spat clouds G7 leaders summit

June 12, 2021 - 8:25pm
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson held meetings with German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron on Saturday on the sidelines of a G-7 summit, as post-Brexit turbulence strains relations between Britain and the EU. After Britain's top diplomat accused the EU of taking a "bloody-minded" approach to relations, Johnson also met the bloc's leaders, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen and European Council President Charles Michel, at the Carbis Bay resort where G-7 leaders are gathering. The two sides are locked in an escalating diplomatic feud over Northern Ireland, the only part of the U.K. that has a land border with the bloc. The EU is angry at British delay in implementing new checks on some goods coming into Northern Ireland from the rest of the U.K. required under the terms of Britain's divorce from the bloc. Britain says the checks are imposing a big burden on businesses and destabilizing Northern Ireland's hard-won peace. The spat has drawn in U.S. President Joe Biden, who is concerned about the potential threat to Northern Ireland's peace accord. Von der Leyen tweeted after meeting Johnson that Northern Ireland peace was "paramount," and the binding Brexit agreement protected it. "We want the best possible relations with the UK. Both sides must implement what we agreed on. There is complete EU unity on this," she said. The EU is threatening legal action if the U.K. does not fully bring in the checks, which include a ban on chilled meats such as sausages from England, Scotland and Wales going to Northern Ireland starting next month. It says Britain must fully implement the agreement, known as the Northern Ireland Protocol, that the two sides agreed and ratified. Britain accuses the bloc of taking a rigid approach to the rules and urged it to be more flexible in order to avoid what has been dubbed a "sausage war." U.K. Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said Saturday that if the EU continued to take a "bloody-minded and purist" approach, Britain would have to act to protect "the integrity of the U.K." Johnson's spokesman, Max Blain said the U.K. wants the protocol to work but that it needs "radical changes." British officials say it's unlikely the issue will be solved during the G-7 summit, which ends Sunday. But Blain said the two sides had agreed to keep talking. Johnson "wants the EU to work with him to find an urgent compromise," he said.
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IIT-K professor appointed member of WHO body

June 12, 2021 - 8:25pm
A professor at IIT-Kanpur has been appointed as an honorary member of the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Air Pollution and Health-Technical Advisory Group (GAPH-TAG), a communique issued by premier institute said. Mukesh Sharma, an air quality expert associated with the civil engineering department at IIT-Kanpur, has melded rigorous research with policy engagement, it said. "Members of the Technical Advisory Group are selected across the globe and appointed by the Director-General, WHO," the communique issued on Friday said. WHO-TAG is an advisory body to the WHO providing technical guidance and inputs to support WHO's efforts and work in the fields of air pollution and health issues, including how member countries can achieve the air pollution and health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDG 3.9.1, 7.1.2 and 11.6.2). The SDGs or Global Goals were adopted by the United Nations in 2015 as a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure that by 2030 all people enjoy peace and prosperity. Sharma has been associated with WHO, Geneva, International Council for Clean Transport, Clean Air Asia United National Environmental Program, Bangkok, and the World Bank, it said. He will be part of the WHO advisory group on interventions/policies for air pollution control in 194 member states, the communique added. IIT-Kanpur Director Abhay Karandikar congratulated Sharma.
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Iconic Goa villa Palacio Aguada sold for Rs 80 crore

June 12, 2021 - 5:25pm
In the 2000s, 'Palacio Aguada', entrepreneur Jimmy Gazdar’s secluded sea-facing property in North Goa was a hot spot for the A-list party scene. Vijay Mallya, for instance, used to arrive in Goa in his private yacht and head to Gazdar's New Year bash before he finally bought and designed his plush Kingfisher Villa in Candolim.With its lush lawns in full bloom, expansive swimming pools, a cave, three dance floors and tea garden, 'Palacio Aguada' was the equivalent of James Bond cool meeting South of France chic. Back then, rumour had it that the late Gazdar, who was a shareholder in rubber-plantation company Cochin Malabars Estates and Industries Ltd, also had pet panthers. The panthers may have gone but the house retains its original aesthetic, one that a source close to new owner Pinky Reddy, wife of Sanjay Reddy of GVK, says will be retained -- including the original name of the property.According to the source, the 5-acre property was acquired by Reddy, who saw the property in March and signed the MOU in April, for the sum of 80 crore. The deal, that’s undergoing due diligence, took barely a month to close as Reddy’s mother and Gazdar’s niece, Rita Mehta (who inherited it from Gazdar) are dear friends. Mehta, who currently lives in Dubai, had preferred to sell her uncle’s home to someone she knew.The source adds that Reddy plans on converting the 5-bedroom property into a 10-12 bedroom boutique hotel that focuses on health, with a spa and clean eating on the menu. The aim is to turn the villa into an international and exclusive destination for wellness. The villa's original architect, Gerard da Cunha, has been roped in to do the renovations and the source reveals he is happy to return to a property that once was his project.Reddy's first visit was for the 2000 New Year's party and she thought it looked outstanding. The source adds that on her recent visit to the property two decades later, her opinion remained unchanged.When contacted, Reddy confirmed the purchase and said, “It has always been a dream of mine to get into the health and wellness space with boutique hotels. I look forward to this new venture.”
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Customer experience post-Covid will never be same

June 12, 2021 - 5:25pm
Covid-19 has indeed changed the customer experience in far more ways than one could imagine. It has disrupted in-person experience to a level that it resulted in a digital space that’s louder and way too harder to cut than ever before.While it has already re-shaped the business landscape; the pioneers of customer experience are deploying strategies not just for the present, but to prepare for the future too. After months of chaos and uncertainty, government policies and rules relating to the pandemic continue to change regularly – it is, therefore, important that organizations also keep a very flexible mind-set and quickly adapt to the new environment.As this pandemic doesn’t seem to end and keeps hitting us waves after waves; we must look at the changing consumer behaviour and the impact this pandemic has had on the way brands meet and manage customers’ expectations.Understanding changing consumer behaviourAs we continue to live in this unprecedented time and see the radical impact this has had on our lives; the effect it had on the consumer psyche and business as well is very apparent.Consumers stockpiled essential goods such as groceries, dry foods and other household products in the wake of this impending crisis. This sudden amplified demand for essentials disrupted the supply chain for most of the FMCGs. On the other hand, non-essential good-to-have product companies witnessed a sharp decline, be it apparel and luxury brands, services industry like travel/hospitality etc.The impact on financial services was not untouched too. The physical touchpoints were to be re-looked on high priority. Some of these changes in customer behaviour seem to be an irreversible trend, forcing companies, more than others and more than ever before, to re-align themselves to the ‘new normal’.They had to look at gaining competitive advantages by embracing this new reality and adopting emerging trends that would help businesses thrive in the new normal.The customer journey facing the greatest disruptionMost of the CX leaders are seeing disruption across all six core customer journeys that includeThe research and need identification journeyThe marketing and sales journeyThe on boarding journeyThe product or service usage journeyThe issue resolution journeyThe re-ordering, renewal or collection/recovery or claim journeyWith many staff still working remotely, the volume of in-person interaction that companies can handle is strictly limited – customers can’t interact with brands in the ways they’re used to or would still like to.In light of this, it is extremely important to build the ability to tolerate uncertainty and being prepared to pivot quickly that may include the following in my opinion:1. Drive customer behaviour changeCX leaders must put a lot of focus on helping those who are not digital and educate them to adopt digital. They must re-imagine parts of key customer experiences or implement solutions that improve or replace affected touch-points.CX leaders must focus on letting their customers know what their options are and what resources are out there to help them, depending on their situations and their current or future needs. It may sound like a long-drawn thing, but the start has to be in that direction – the sooner the better.When there’s a government announcement or policy rollout, we must reach out to our customers and educate them on how they can be benefited and how we as a company can help them achieve that.In a nutshell, we have to start driving the paradigm shift in moving our customers to adopt digital and make them future-ready.2. Accessing customer needsWith no end to the pandemic insight, companies need to understand what their customers need now, at the moment. Only once CX leaders have used all the tools at their disposal to assess the situation will they be able to judge how best to amend their strategies for the months and years aheadThey may (or must) use all possible tools like ‘digital customer analytics’, ‘social media listening’, ‘focus group’, ‘customer journey re-mapping ‘customer feedback’ along ‘employee feedback’. This shall help them re-align their entire customer journey mapping to the need of the hour, the current crisis.3. Replace in-person touchpoints with digitalWe’re seeing a lot of digital adoption and our digital channel transactions have gone up but this is just a small part of the job done.We’ve had a huge amount of work to be carried out to get all our call centres mobilised in terms of working-from-home and getting the all necessary equipment to staff.Customer on-boarding journeys have been the hardest hit by Covid-19. In financial services such as lending businesses; we have had a huge dependency on in-person interactions similar to banking or insurance. We had to quickly turn out on a digital boarding journey and had to make them a touchless process. While that helped in business continuity but as iterated earlier, it’s a long-drawn thing and customers may take time to adapt to this – we still see a very positive trajectory building up. This may well work to our advantage as we reduce the cost of acquisition substantially.4. Invest in technology:As said above, setting up the contact centre for remote working was just one part of addressing the impact this pandemic has had post-Covid-19. This was perhaps the simplest of the tasks as we now realise. This shall now be less of a priority for CX leaders as we move ahead.The bigger thing would be to invest further in technology. Some of the things that we did in our organisations and a few are work-in-progress which I strongly recommend to all CX leaders:Invest in data, integration, integrity or enrichment of technologyInvest in multi-channel customer experience platforms. Give all possible online options to customers to reach out and interact with you.Install chatbots with ‘live takeovers’ capabilitiesVoice bots that use NLP (Natural language processing)Invest in digital self-serve space. Customers are now more open to having their issues resolved themselves instead of queuing up on a toll-free number to interact with a customer service agent.Deploy interactive personalised video content both for educational purposes and transactional services. 5. Addressing barriers to CX success in ‘New Normal’It is now apparent that the best practices for engaging with customers will now be different in a post-pandemic world.While customers will continue to expect the same level of service levels albeit more through digital channels; we must continue to provide an Omnichannel experience and keep in-person touchpoints available too in some cases.We, as CX leaders, must therefore channelize the organisations to mobilise the resources into investing significantly in this direction and address the barriers as early as possible:We must prioritise our investments. We cannot continue to play old-school and imagine a different (favourable) result in this new normal. Our investments have to be towards technology and digital avenues. We must start securing organisation-wide support to this effect and re-imagine customer journeys, enrich business processes and re-align them quickly and continue to measure the impact of such changes to gauge customer experience. It is cyclic in nature that helps in continued advancements to business.ConclusionThe differentiator in this new world isn’t going to be based on ‘product’ and ‘prices’ anymore; instead, it is going to be ‘customer experience’. Those who embrace this new normal and deliver a seamless digital experience will only succeed and leave the competition behind.The writer is Head of Operations, Compliance & CS, Clix Capital.
Categories: Business News

Cong will 'relook' at Art 370: Digvijaya

June 12, 2021 - 5:25pm
Congress leader Digvijaya Singh's comments in a clubhouse conversation that the revocation of Article 370 and stripping Jammu and Kashmir of statehood was an "extremely sad" decision and his party will have a "relook" at the issue have triggered a row, with the BJP accusing him of speaking against India and in agreement with Pakistan. Singh's remarks to a person, who the BJP said was a journalist of Pakistani origin, was seized by the saffron party leaders to hit out at the opposition party with its spokesperson Sambit Patra demanding statements from Congress president Sonia Gandhi and her son Rahul Gandhi on the issue. "The decision of revoking Article 370 and reducing the statehood of J&K is extremely, I would say, sad decision, and the Congress party would certainly have a relook on the issue," Singh said, according to bits of conversation available on social media. He was responding to a question about the "way forward" on the issue once the Modi government is gone. As the BJP attacked him, Singh posted a tweet in Hindi in an apparent jibe at the ruling party. "This bunch of illiterate people cannot probably differentiate between 'shall' and 'consider'," the former Madhya Pradesh chief minister said. अनपढ़ लोगों की जमात को Shall और Consider में फ़र्क़ शायद समझ में नहीं आता।— digvijaya singh (@digvijaya_28) 1623474592000 Attacking him, Patra told reporters, "We have all seen how Digvijaya Singh is spitting venom on India and speaking in agreement with Pakistan. This is the same person who had dubbed the Pulwama attack as an accident and described the 26/11 Mumabi attack as RSS conspiracy." The BJP leader cited old comments of other Congress leaders, including Rahul Gandhi and Mani Shankar Aiyar, to allege that Singh's remarks were part of a larger pattern of the party being "hand in glove" with Pakistan. "This is all part of the toolkit which the BJP had exposed," Patra said in a reference to a controversial document rejected as fake by the Congress. The Congress would go to the extent of collaborating with China and Pakistan to spread "hate" against Modi and India, he alleged. "The Congress should change its name from INC (Indian National Congress) to ANC, Anti-national Clubhouse. This is such a clubhouse whose members have begun hating India while hating Modi," he alleged. Patra asked Sonia Gandhi and Rahul to make their party's stand clear on the issue. He claimed that Rahul Gandhi is the leader of these Congress politicians, adding that Pakistan prime minister Imran Khan had used his criticism of Article 370 as part of his country's dossier against India on the issue in the UN. Union ministers Giriraj Singh and Kiren Rijiju were among other BJP leaders who targeted the Congress in their tweets over the issue. Singh alleged, "Congress's first love is Pakistan. Digvijaya Singh conveyed Rahul Gandhi's message to Pakistan. Congress will help Pakistan in grabbing Kashmir."
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Does plant-based diet help beat COVID?

June 12, 2021 - 5:25pm
Since the beginning of the pandemic, it's been suggested that certain foods or diets may offer protection against COVID-19. But are these sorts of claims reliable? A recent study published in BMJ Nutrition, Prevention and Health sought to test this hypothesis. It found that health professionals who reported following diets that are vegetarian, vegan or pescatarian (those that exclude meat but include fish) had a lower risk of developing moderate-to-severe COVID-19. Additionally, the study found that those who said they eat a low-carbohydrate or high-protein diet seemed to have an increased risk of contracting moderate-to-severe COVID-19. This may make it sound like certain food preferences - such as being vegetarian or a fish eater - may benefit you by reducing the risk of COVID-19. But in reality, things aren't so clear. Self-reporting and small samples First, it's important to underline that reported diet type didn't influence the initial risk of contracting COVID-19. The study isn't suggesting that diet changes the risk of getting infected. Nor did it find links between diet type and length of illness. Rather, the study only suggests that there's a link between diet and the specific risk of developing moderate-to-severe COVID-19 symptoms. It's also important to consider the actual number of people involved. Just under 3,000 health professionals took part, spread across six western countries, and only 138 developed moderate-to-severe disease. As each person placed their diet into one of 11 categories, this left a very small number eating certain types of diet and then even smaller numbers getting seriously ill. This meant, for instance, that fish eaters had to be grouped together with vegetarians and vegans to produce meaningful results. In the end only 41 vegetarians/vegans contracted COVID-19 and only five fish eaters got the disease. Of these, just a handful went on to develop moderate-to-severe COVID-19. Working with such small numbers increases the risk of a falsely identifying a relationship between factors when there isn't one - what statisticians call a type 1 error. Then there is another problem with studies of this type. It's observational only, so can only suggest theories about what is happening, rather than any causality of diet over the effects of COVID-19. To attempt to show something is actually causal, you ideally need to test it as an intervention - that is, get someone to switch to doing it for the study, give it time to show an effect, and then compare the results with people who haven't had that intervention. This is how randomised controlled trials work and why they are considered the best source of evidence. They are a much more robust method of testing whether one single thing is having an effect on something else. Plus, there is also the problem that the diet people say they consume may not be what they actually eat. A questionnaire was used to find out what foods people ate specifically, but responses to this were also self-reported. It also had only 47 questions, so subtle but influential differences in people's diets may have gone unnoticed. After all, the foods available in the US do differ from those available in Spain, France, Italy, the UK and Germany. So what does this tell us? When it comes to trying to determine the best diet for protecting against COVID-19, the truth is we don't have enough quality data - even with the results of this study, which are a small data set and only observational. And a further issue is that the study didn't look at the quality of people's diets by assessing which foods they actually ate. This is another reason why it needs treating with caution. Self-declared diet types or food questionnaires may not capture information on the variety and type of foods eaten - for instance missing details about how much fresh or processed food someone eats, how meals are eaten and with whom. And as alluded to above, self-reported data on what people eat is also notoriously inaccurate. The bottom line is: the name of what you call your diet is far less important than what you actually eat. Just because a diet is vegetarian or pescatarian doesn't automatically make it healthy. For now, the robust evidence isn't there to suggest that being vegetarian or pescatarian protects against COVID-19 - so there's no need to rush to switch your diet as a result of this study. However, what we do know is that keeping active, eating a sensible healthy diet and keeping our weight in check helps to fortify us against a wide range of health issues, and this could include COVID-19. Perhaps the best advice is simply to keep following general dietary guidelines: that is, that we should eat a variety of foods, mainly vegetables, fruit, pulses, nuts, seeds and whole grains, with few highly processed foods that are high in sugar, salt and fat.(This article is syndicated by PTI from The Conversation)
Categories: Business News

Yoga & a to-do list help Realme India boss stay productive

June 12, 2021 - 5:25pm
Madhav Sheth, CEO – Realme India and Europe starts his day by practicing meditation and yoga. "It allows me to have a much more peaceful start to the day with a laser-minded focus. We have all settled into the WFH schedules in this one year, and so have I," he says.Setting his to-do list for the day makes work from home easier. It indicates what to do, when to do and when to call it a day and maintain work-life balance. Sheth checks in with various teams to assess the situation. Fitness track"Sometimes, back-to-back work and meetings fatigue me, so I make sure to take breaks to rest, participate in team-building events, and exercise regularly to remain mentally fit. I am quite old-school by nature, but I love technology and I am quite enthusiastic about exploring different apps through the lens of the users. Nothing compares to working next to someone in an office, but joining a video conference with my team members via Zoom call during the day helps to bridge the gap," he says.It's important to have a dedicated workspace in order to maintain work efficiency and maintain a healthy work-life balance. As a result, Sheth has a dedicated workspace that he used only for work"I like being comfortable while I work, so my work-from-home style mostly includes pairing up a realme T-shirt with a pair of jeans or shorts," he says.Working from home was initially difficult due to different kinds of distractions at home, but with self-discipline and a dedicated workspace, Sheth was able to manage and overcome these obstacles."One of the most important elements for a smooth flow of work is effective communication, and the lack of face-to-face communication, especially right before launch, was another challenge. As a result, my first step towards establishing effective communication was to follow various communication platforms such as Microsoft Teams and Zoom for conducting regular meetings," he says.Daily driveSheth wakes up early in the morning. I get up at 5 am, which gives him enough energy to get through the day. "I strive to create a positive atmosphere around me and at work; this not only helps to create a positive work environment but also motivates me to work on my projects with a renewed sense of intent and enthusiasm. I set targets for the day after completing the first part of my morning routine. Additionally, I make a to-do list of regular activities. Since most of my time is spent in the office, spending some quality time with my kids in the morning is a priority," he says.Yoga and meditation are regular practices for Sheth and these daily exercises infuse a feeling of bliss and calmness in him. "I have been regularly practicing yoga and meditation, and have been focusing on strengthening my core muscles. I have adopted certain forms of yoga during this period," he says.Sheth used to play the guitar during his college days and wished to sing for a band. "During the lockdown, I tried a few musical notes and spent some time on them. Having said that, what truly fascinates me is technology, its versatile application in products, and how they simplify and elevate everyday life," he says.He loves to wash his cars sometimes. "It’s my way of unwinding through a leisurely activity," Sheth ends.
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Can you go to US from India via 3rd country?

June 12, 2021 - 5:25pm
With immigration rules constantly changing with the pandemic situation, it is difficult to keep up to date with it all.For our NRI readers, we have started an immigration helpdesk. Write to us at nri.economictimes@gmail.com and our team of experts will address the most pressing issues.*Please note that questions have been edited and/or clubbed so that we can address similar queries at once and that the answers are clear and relevant to our audience.Can a B-1/B-2 visa holder travel to the U.S. from India after spending 14 days in a third country before arriving in the U.S.?The short answer is, yes. This is definitely a way to overcome the travel restrictions that apply to most travelers who have been in India within the 14 days prior to anticipated arrival in the U.S. The challenge is to get to a third country that is accepting travelers from India. Further, Indian nationals may need a visa to travel to the third country, which may pose an additional challenge as visa services for most countries remain suspended in India due to local lockdown conditions. It would be a good idea to check with a proficient travel agent to determine which country(ies) will accept travelers from India and which of these allow for visa-free travel or give visas on arrival to Indian nationals.Please note that anyone traveling to the U.S. by air must provide evidence of a negative COVID-19 test taken within three days of travel or evidence of recovery from a recent COVID-19 infection. We have a valid return ticket to Lagos but Etihad has not started yet. It is more than a year now. Can we claim our NRI Status or will have to pay taxes?I am not a tax advisor but am aware that NRI tax status could be lost due to extended physical presence in India. We advise you to contact a tax lawyer or a CA who has knowledge in such matters.I am a green card holder and came to India in October 2018 on a 2-year travel permit valid up to 19th November 2020. Can I travel to the U.S. or must I apply for an SB-1 visa?If an airline will onboard you for travel to the U.S. you should do so and request Customs and Border Patrol (CBP - immigration officers) at the port of entry to grant you admission into the country. It is important to take this approach under the guidance of a qualified attorney. You are most likely to be admitted into the country but may be subject to additional questioning and in some circumstances may have to present your case before an immigration judge. If you face difficulty with boarding a plane to the U.S. you may ask the airline to communicate with CBP’s Regional Carrier Liaison Group for assistance with their request to allow boarding.My wife and I hold valid L visas (L-1 and L-2). Our son is 7 years old and is an American citizen. Currently, we all are in India. Can we all travel together to US based on the exemption? What proof do we need to provide while traveling to the U.S.?Yes, you can travel to the U.S. because nonimmigrant visa holders (including L visa holders) are not subject to travel ban based on their familial relationship to a U.S. citizen or LPR spouse or unmarried minor child and do not need an NIE (national interest exception). This is true even if the minor child is not traveling with the parent. Such travelers must present proof of the qualifying relationship to airline officials when initiating travel to the United States.I am in the U.S. on an H-1B visa but need to visit India for a family emergency. Will I be subject to the travel ban from India? Would I be eligible for a National Interest Exception?Yes, you will be subject to the travel ban unless you need to travel to the U.S. for support or executive direction for critical infrastructure or to provide vital support or executive direction for significant economic activity in the United States. You may also qualify for an NIE if your work is related to public health response or national security. If you think you qualify for an NIE, you must contact the Consulate or Embassy in your jurisdiction to procure an NIE.Please note that nonimmigrant visa holders (including H-1B holders), who are not subject to travel ban based on their familial relationship to a U.S. citizen or LPR spouse or unmarried minor child, do not need an NIE. Such travelers should present proof of the qualifying relationship to airline officials when initiating travel to the United States.I need an M-1 Visa to join acting school in July 2021. Do I qualify for an NIE? Is there any other way to work around the restrictions on travel from India?M-1 students who are subject to the travel ban because of physical presence in India may be eligible for NIE if the start date of their program is August 1, 2021 or later. Students seeking to apply for new F-1or M-1 visas should check the status of visa services at the nearest Embassy or Consulate; those applicants who are found to be otherwise qualified for an F-1 or M-1 visa will automatically be considered for an NIE to travel. However, at present U.S. Consulates and the Embassy in India are not scheduling visa interviews, which are mandatory for most visa applicants. You should monitor the situation carefully for updates on these services. Students who have a valid F-1 or M-1 visa may spend 14 days in a third country before seeking to enter the U.S. Please see our response to another question above on this topic in today’s edition of FAQs. 83457548The author's views do not necessarily represent the views of ET Online nor do they constitute legal advice or representation. Practice tips provided in the written materials are based on the author's experiences and the current state of the law and regulations. Please be sure to conduct legal research and analysis, or engage independent counsel for your unique situation as the law and requirements change quickly and the author's experiences may differ from your own.
Categories: Business News

After conquering ports and airports, Gautam Adani sets sights on cement sector

June 12, 2021 - 5:25pm
MUMBAI: After capturing a lion’s share of the market in the country’s ports and airport businesses, India’s second richest man Gautam Adani has now set his sights on the country’s cement sector.The Adani Group’s flagship company Adani Enterprises, on Saturday, informed the bourses that it has incorporated a new wholly-owned subsidiary Adani Cement Industries with an authorized share capital of Rs 10 lakh and paid-up capital of Rs 5 lakh.The newly incorporated company has no turnover to boast of and will be headquartered in Gujarat, Adani Enterprises said in a regulatory filing.The move is likely to cause some perspiration in the cement sector as it will further intensify the competitiveness of a space that is expected to do well in the years ahead.Analysts are bullish on the cement space as they see it as a proxy for the revival of capital expenditure in the country once the Covid-19 related shock has dissipated.“I would prefer cement over metals. It is a pure domestic sector where there is no policy challenge from elsewhere. It depends completely on India’s own demand situation,” Ridham Desai, managing director at Morgan Stanley, told ETNow recently.Desai believes that the sector could see a breakout in terms of volumes in the coming two years, which in the presence of limited capacity addition, could help companies enjoy pricing power. “So that (cement) could be a more exciting sector than metals,” Desai said.Adani’s bet on the cement sector is also a vote of confidence on the country’s infrastructure space, which after years of chronic underinvestment and bad loan crisis, is expected to emerge stronger post the ongoing pandemic.This is not the first new venture for the billionaire. Earlier this year, Adani Enterprises incorporated a new business Adani Copper to take advantage of the global boom in copper demand post the re-opening of economies across the world.How Adani will go about building the cement company remains to be seen, but past experience suggests that Adani Cement could adopt an aggressive acquisition strategy that has seen it control large shares of India’s port and airport business recently.Gautam Adani has mastered the art of taking advantage of distressed valuation of performing assets in the pandemic era, a skill that has seen his personal wealth rise over $43 billion in the first six months of 2021, the fastest rise for any individual in the world, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires’ Index.On Friday, shares of Adani Enterprises ended 0.7 per cent lower at Rs 1,601 on the NSE.
Categories: Business News

Overstretched Nifty technical setup and precariously low VIX all raising red flags

June 12, 2021 - 5:25pm
While trading in a narrower range, Nifty continued its bounce and ended on a positive note for the fourth consecutive week. The index went on to mark its incremental fresh lifetime high, as it continued to trend higher on reduced and decelerating momentum. The trading range remained narrow of 268 points against 359 points in the week before. However, Nifty continued to close higher and posted gains of 129 points, or 0.82 per cent, on a weekly basis. With this, Nifty has gained 1,121 points over the past four weeks.For the coming week, the main worry for the market will be its own overstretched technical setup. This, when read along with the precariously low VIX value, raises a red flat for the immediate short term. Although the trade setup on the weekly charts looks stable and strong, Nifty is bit overstretched on the daily chart. And the momentum seems to be decelerating over the past couple of days.Volatility continued to decline unabated. INDIA VIX came off by another 11.53 per cent to 14.10 level. Options data suggested that Nifty has seen near-consistent and near-similar Call writing at 15,800, 15,900 and 16,000 levels. This would make another 200 points gain a very stiff resistance area for the market.83460181It is unlikely to be smooth sailing for the market in the coming week. The 15,865 and 15,945 levels will act as key resistance points, while supports will come in lower at 15,630 and 15,500 levels. Any corrective action is likely to widen the trading range on the downside.The weekly RSI stood at 69.09 level. It has shown a strong bearish divergence against the price. While Nifty formed a new 14-period high, the RSI did not, and this resulted in a bearish divergence. The weekly MACD has shown a positive crossover. It is now showing a bullish setup and stands above the Signal Line. A candle with a long lower shadow has occurred. This exhibits fatigue for Nifty at higher levels.There are no distinct signs that indicate outright weakness on the Nifty charts. The is undoubtedly a buoyant signal, as Nifty trades at its all-time high point in the uncharted territory.83460200However, that said, the VIX remains at its lowest level of recent time and this indicates a period of low volatility and complacency. Such periods are often followed by a spike in volatility and can lead to a period of high volatility. Such events may trigger measured corrective movement, and if not, can at least push the market again into a broad range-bound consolidation.The market is moving towards becoming highly stock-specific and warrants a very efficient risk management by the participants. This is the time when one needs to keep trailing stop losses as vigilant protection of profit at current and higher levels would assume importance. We strongly suggest taking some profits off the table and putting trail stop losses to ensure optimal profit protection.While remaining highly selective, fresh purchases should be kept at modest levels and one should maintain a cautious stance on the market.83460208In our look at the Relative Rotation Graphs®, we compared various sectoral indices against CNX500 (Nifty500 Index), which represents over 95% of the free-float market-cap of all the listed stocks.A review of the Relative Rotation Graphs (RRG) shows although individual performance continued in the metal stocks, Nifty Metal Index, along with Smallcaps and the Commodities indices, continued to pare relative momentum while being placed inside the leading quadrant. Nifty Parma is steady inside the leading quadrant; while the PSE Index has rotated back inside the leading quadrant. One can expect stock-specific relative outperformance from these individual groups.Nifty Midcap 100 Index stays inside the lagging quadrant and so does the Nifty Infrastructure Index. The PSU Bank Index also lies inside the lagging quadrant, but it is seen attempting to improve its relative momentum against the broader Nifty500 Index.Nifty Services Sector, Realty and the Nifty Bank indices are inside the lagging quadrant. Nifty Auto and the Nifty Financial Services Indices are all inside the lagging quadrant. However, they appear to be consolidating and mildly improving their relative momentum. However, barring isolated stock-specific performance, these groups may relatively underperform the broader market.Nifty Consumption and the FMCG indices are rotating southwest towards the lagging quadrant, although they are currently placed inside the improving quadrant. A similar rotation was also observed in the IT Index. Nifty Media is placed firmly inside the improving quadrant and appears to be maintaining its relative momentum against the broader market.Important Note: The RRGTM charts show the relative strength and momentum for a group of stocks. In the above chart, they show relative performance against Nifty500 Index (broader markets) and should not be used directly as buy or sell signals.(Milan Vaishnav, CMT, MSTA is a Consultant Technical Analyst and founder of Gemstone Equity Research & Advisory Services, Vadodara. He can be reached at milan.vaishnav@equityresearch.asia)
Categories: Business News

Are concerns over Covaxin valid?

June 12, 2021 - 2:24pm
Dr NK Ganguly, Scientist & Former DG, ICMR throws light on why the US Food and Drug Administration denied Emergency Use Authorisation (EUA) to Bharat Biotech's Covaxin and what is causing the delay in getting approval from World Health Organisation (WHO). Edited excerpts:Tamanna Inamdar: About all the questions around Covaxin and if I were to compress them-- they come down to why is the phase three trial data not out yet. In March was when the phase three trial was supposed to have ended. In April, we saw a press release with interim results. Now the company says we will put out the data in July, today in the health ministry briefing we are told it will be out in seven to eight days. Why all this mystery over the phase three trial data?Dr NK Ganguly: Actually, it was foolish to apply to US FDA for approval because even in the emergency authorisation vaccine guidelines, you have to complete phase three and wait for two months for safety data and this was a huge concession. Normally, you have to wait for six months. They did not do it, then to put in an application was a foolish step. The second thing was-- that the phase three trial itself changed shape because Indian regulators gave the approval since we needed a vaccine and perhaps our main aim was to vaccinate the largest population, they looked at the phase two data and gave them a trial mode approval. This trial mode approval was massed in a very different jargon but trial mode approval meant that there was no competitor group now. The group which was given the vaccine --they knew that what they were getting and they had to sign an informed consent form. So, I do not know what kind of phase three data which we will have and whether we can call it a phase three data and then some of things---we will not know what is its efficacy because the end point for most of vaccine trials at that time was freedom from disease, it was not freedom from virus that much, it was freedom from disease. It was not lean to antibody levels because the antibody level was not made an end point and it was thought that we may have a little bit of virus in our nasopharynx and our throat which will perhaps be okay because some of the data from Pfizer and others came-- where we knew that they will not transmit and we now know that asymptomatic also benefit from the better vaccines. What they should have done after the approval, they should have completed the trial atleast in a larger population-- this was a mistake because vaccines are for the world, vaccines are not for your own country and most of the vaccine trials are done in multiple countries. Some of those guys who did this kind of thing in China and Russia --they put in their population but they were clever enough to do it in Russia, Brazil, South Africa, UAE, Bahrain-- so they collected different ethnic population, global data and in those countries, they went through the complete process of the approval. By the time they applied for WHO for pre-qualification approval or other approval, the Chinese vaccine guys have got that WHO pre-qualification approval, the four of them have got it now. This shortcut was a big mistake and this should not have been resorted to. As far as your other question that whether the students will get vaccine certification or not, if it is not an approved vaccine, WHO has the prequalified vaccine for an international approval stamp. So if it is not WHO prequalified vaccine, you are not going to get that benefit.Tamanna Inamdar: All of us want to know whether it safe to take Covaxin, in fact there is one school of thought which thinks Covaxin is a superior platform because it is a long trusted platform, what is your view on this, is Covaxin safe, is it okay to take and will it eventually get WHO approval?Actually, they had this platform for a long period but because of their first vaccine, the rotavirus vaccine was in the Vero cell under virus replication. Dr Bhan has helped them a lot and lot of people, Roger Glass, Dr Harry Greenberg, many people have helped them in getting the cell lines right and growing the virus. So, there is not much technology over here, you grow the virus in a standardised cell form and then kill it and then give it as a vaccine and when it works but it has some limit-- that is why people were also using various platforms that, whether the Adeno platform, Newcastle disease virus platform, whether the different platforms were creating the ones which are safer and tested one like messenger RNA which was for 10 years- 15 years on the making. So, these were the platforms which went in, the main problem in virus vaccine is the trust and utter transparency and exposing it with the virus...
Categories: Business News

SAD, BSP form alliance for Punjab polls

June 12, 2021 - 2:24pm
The Shiromani Akali Dal (SAD) and the Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) formed an alliance on Saturday for the 2022 Punjab Assembly election. Announcing the tie-up at a press conference, SAD president Sukhbir Singh Badal described it as a "new day in politics of Punjab". "Today, is a historic day...a big turn in Punjab's politics," he said in the presence of BSP General Secretary Satish Chandra Mishra. He said the SAD and the BSP will jointly fight the 2022 polls and other elections together. The Mayawati-led BSP will fight 20 of the 117 Assembly seats in Punjab, while the rest will be contested by the SAD, he said. Among the seats which the BSP will contest are Kartarpur Sahib in Jalandhar, Jalandhar-West, Jalandhar-North, Phagwara, Hoshiarpur Urban, Dasuya, Chamkaur Sahib in Rupnagar district, Bassi Pathana, Sujanpur in Pathankot, Mohali, Amritsar North and Amritsar Central. The SAD earlier had a tie-up with the BJP and the Badal-led party walked out of the NDA over the farm laws issue last year. The BJP used to contest 23 seats under its alliance with the SAD.
Categories: Business News

How ransomware became a global security threat

June 12, 2021 - 2:24pm
Good morning,Hi, it’s Zaheer. Last month, hackers used a piece of computer code called ransomware to take down the systems of a major American oil pipeline by encrypting its data. It was the biggest such attack on US critical infrastructure ever. Though this type of malicious software has been around for decades, it's only in the past 10 years that ransomware attacks have grown from a cottage industry for crooks into a multi-billion-dollar racket and global security threat.What’s your data worth... to you? 83452095GIF Credit: GiphyOn May 7, hackers launched a ransomware attack on an American oil pipeline system that carries petrol and jet fuel, forcing it to halt operations.Spanning nearly 9,000 km between Texas and New York, the Colonial Pipeline is the largest pipeline system for refined oil products in the US.The attack on it was “probably the most significant ransomware attack on one of our critical infrastructures ever,” said John Katko, US Representative for New York's 24th congressional district. Within hours, the Colonial Pipeline Company -- with the help of the FBI -- paid the hackers the 75 bitcoin ($4.4 million at the time) ransom they had demanded. On receiving the payment, the hackers gave the company a decrypting tool to restore its computer network. But the tool was so slow that the company continued using its own backups to restore the system, Bloomberg reported. Though the most egregious, the attack on Colonial Pipeline was hardly unique. In the past two years ransomware attacks have become frighteningly commonplace. There were seven ransomware attacks in the US every hour during 2020, targeting individuals, businesses and -- increasingly -- vital infrastructure.The hackers 83452137Photo Credit: (Chris Carlson/AP)Soon after the attack, the FBI confirmed that DarkSide, a cybercriminal group believed to have originated in eastern Europe, was behind it.This sophisticated group of hackers has a finely tuned business model through which it offers ransomware as a service. After screening potential affiliates with an interview, it gives them access to ransomware in return for a cut of the payment. This is reportedly 25% for payments under $500,000 and 10% for those over $5 million.What is ransomware?Ransomware is a type of malicious software that’s used to lock or encrypt a victim’s data, and then demand a ransom to restore access. There are two main types: Crypto-ransomware encrypts the files on infected computers with a key that only the attacker knows.Locker ransomware doesn’t encrypt the files but locks the user out of their computer.How does it spread?Emails: Links and attachmentsSocial media: Malicious links on Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, etc.Malvertising: A legitimate advertising site seeded with malicious code.Infected programs: An application or program containing malicious code.Drive-by infections: Malicious code embedded in web pages and pop-ups.Traffic Distribution System (TDS): A link on a legitimate gateway web page that redirects the user to a malicious site.Self-propagation: Through network and USB drives.A brief history of ransomware 83452169Ransomware only became a serious threat in 2012, when about 600,000 new such programmes were discovered In a three-month period. But the history of this odious tool began a quarter of a century earlier -- the year the Berlin Wall came down -- with what has come to be known as the AIDS Trojan.A strange birth: The first known ransomware attack was in 1989 by Joseph Popp, an AIDS researcher, who distributed 20,000 floppy disks to other AIDS researchers in more than 90 countries. Popp claimed they contained software that analysed a person’s risk of acquiring AIDS.But the disk also contained malware, which was activated after the infected computer was powered on 90 times. The programme then displayed a message demanding a payment of $189 and another $378 for a software lease. Childhood: Ransomware attacks remained rare until the mid-2000s, when hackers began using more sophisticated encryption algorithms such as RSA encryption to lock victims’ data.Adolescence: Since 2012, new strains of ransomware have been wreaking havoc on businesses and individuals around the world.Kaspersky reported that between April 2014 and March 2015, the top 10 ransomware programmes were able to attack 101,568 users around the world, accounting for 77.48% of all victims of crypto-ransomware during that period.CryptoLocker, one of the most successful ransomware programmes of its time, infected more than 250,000 systems and earned its creators more than $3 million between September and December 2013.Perhaps the most well-known ransomware to date is WannaCry, a worm that spread through a number of networks in May 2017. It exploited a Windows vulnerability that was suspected to have been first discovered by the US National Security Agency. Wannacry was tentatively linked by security researchers to the Lazarus Group, a cybercrime organisation suspected to have links with the North Korean government.Adulthood: In the past two years, ransomware has become a multi-billion-dollar industry -- and a full-blown national security issue for countries such as the United States.There were 65,000 ransomware attacks in the US last year, or about seven every hour, according to Recorded Future, a cybersecurity firm in Boston. According to Chainalysis, victims of ransomware paid nearly $350 million worth of cryptocurrency to hackers in 2020, 311% more than in the previous year.How much money is involved? A study by Palo Alto Networks and Crypsis released in March found that the average payment following a ransomware attack in 2020 shot up 171% to $312,493 from $115,123 in 2019.It also found that the highest ransom demanded in 2020, $30 million, was double the highest seen between 2015 and 2019. In 2020, hackers demanded an average of $847,344 (Rs 6.2 crore) per ransomware attack, it said.To pay or not to pay? Though the FBI facilitated the ransom payments in the Colonial Pipeline case as it involved vital infrastructure, the agency generally discourages paying up, saying it encourages and emboldens criminals. Despite this, many victims of ransomware attacks choose to pay.But even paying the ransom doesn’t guarantee access to your files. The CryptoLocker ransomware, for instance, extorted $3 million from victims but didn't decrypt the files of everyone who paid. And a survey by Datto found attackers didn’t unlock victims’ data in one out of every four cases where ransoms were paid.Ransomware in IndiaA report by Check Point research found that India has seen the most number of attacks attempts per organisation in 2021, with an average of 213 attacks a week since the start of the year. Here’s the top 10:India 213Argentina 104Chile 103France 61Taiwan 50Singapore 48Belgium 46Nepal 37Canada 31US 29Another survey, The State of Ransomware 2021 by cybersecurity firm Sophos, found that Indian organisations were the most likely of all countries surveyed to pay a ransom to get their data back. About 67% of Indian organisations whose data was encrypted paid a ransom to get it back, more than twice the global average of 32%. The survey also found that the cost of recovering from a ransomware attack more than doubled from $761,106 in 2020 to $1.85 million in 2021, globally. In India, this number tripled from $1.1 million in 2020, to $3.38 million in 2021.Indian organizations that paid the ransom got back, on average, 75% of their data, compared to a global average of 65%. Only 4% got all their data back.Let's move on to other big developments of the weekETtech DEALS DIGEST■ New age logistics and supply chain startup Delhivery plans to go public in India anytime between December this year and March 2022 and aims to raise primary capital of $400-500 million. It had raised $277 million financing from marquee investors such as Fidelity, GIC and others last month. The funding round valued the firm at $3 billion, a 50% jump from $2 billion following a secondary investment from Steadview Capital in December 2020. 83452207We also recently looked at how the company's valuation has risen and its cap table has evolved over the years in collaboration with data platform Tracxn.■ Amazon, Google and card network major Visa are separately eyeing a stake in neo-banking startup Open, which is looking to raise a new round of funding of about $100-$120 million. If successful, Open's valuation is likely to jump three times to around $600-700 million. The firm is also in talks with a leading sovereign wealth fund as well as private equity firm TPG.■ Paytm is in exploratory talks with three payment gateway firms — BillDesk, PayU and BSE-listed Infibeam Avenues — for a possible acquisition, merger or picking up a substantial equity stake in these firms. This comes at a time when it is looking to raise about $3 billion through an IPO later this year. Paytm parent One97 Communications is contemplating a mix of fresh issuance of shares along with an Offer for Sale (OFS) for shareholders for its proposed public issue. 83452240Paytm also plans to loan Rs 740 crore to its founder Vijay Shekhar Sharma to fund his purchase of Raheja QBE general insurance company. The deal, which was announced in July last year, is expected to be crucial for the IPO plans of the Noida-based digital payments major.■ Kedaara Capital has raised more than $1 billion for its third fund, in what is perhaps the largest fundraising by an India-dedicated private equity (PE) firm. It had previously raised $575 million in 2013 for its first fund and $750 million four years ago. Following this deal, Kedaara will manage nearly $2.5 billion in assets, behind ChrysCapital and Everstone among large Indian PE firms. 83452397■ Tata Digital invested $75 million in health and fitness startup Curefit and appointed its co-founder Mukesh Bansal as president. It also acquired a majority stake in online pharmacy 1mg. 83452401OTHER BIG STORIES BY OUR REPORTERSED sends showcause notice to WazirX 83452412The Enforcement Directorate (ED) has asked India’s largest cryptocurrency exchange, WazirX, to explain transactions worth Rs 2,790.74 crore that the agency alleged were carried out in violation of foreign exchange rules.Karnataka HC rejects Amazon, Flipkart plea against CCI investigationFlipkart and Amazon India will likely challenge the order, said people with knowledge of the matter. They have 30 days to appeal.Twitter has declined govt orders it disagreed with: Legal chief Vijaya GaddeIn recent weeks, the San Francisco headquartered company has been resisting demands by the Indian government to remove tags of “manipulated media” from the tweets of several BJP leaders Startups uncertain on future vaccination drives after change in pricing policySeveral delivery and e-commerce startups that undertook mass vaccination drives for their employees or delivery executives in partnership with private hospitals are unclear on how the government’s move to cap the service charge for vaccine jabs at private hospitals will impact their future camps.Creators get new tools to monetise their audience 83452420Indian startups are building paid-private communities, cohort-based platforms, tipping features, and other tools to cater to the 2-5 million individuals in the growing creator economy across the country.How LGBTQ+ couples are normalising expression of their love on the internet 83452423A growing number of couples from the LGBTQ+ community are turning influencers on social media for normalising expressing love for their significant other, amassing thousands of followers on platforms such as Twitter and Instagram and attracting the attention of brands seeking collaboration.Staffing companies see rising demand for managed servicesStaffing firms are tapping the need for managed IT infrastructure in smaller towns where larger IT services firms don't have a large presence.Food delivery companies see demand spike from small townsReverse migration from metros helped friends and family in non-metro cities get acquainted with food ordering, which contributed to increased interest in these regions, according to an expert who tracks the industry.That's about it from us this week. Stay safe and get vaccinated when you get the opportunity.
Categories: Business News

Biden to urge G-7 leaders to compete China

June 12, 2021 - 2:24pm
The United States plans to push democratic allies on Saturday to publicly call out China for forced labour practices as the Group of Seven leaders gather at a summit where they will also unveil an infrastructure plan meant to compete with Beijing's efforts in the developing world. The provocative proposal is part of President Joe Biden's escalating campaign to get fellow democratic leaders to present a more unified front to compete economically with China in the century ahead, according to two senior administration officials who briefed reporters on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the plans for the seaside summit publicly. The officials said Biden wanted G-7 leaders to speak out in a single voice against forced labour practices targeting Uyghur Muslims and other ethnic minorities. Biden hopes the denunciation will be part of the joint communique released at the summit's end, but some European allies have been reluctant to so forcefully split with Beijing. It may not be clear until the three-day summit ends on Sunday whether the leaders will take that step. The wealthy nations' leaders were all smiles and unity as they were welcomed to the summit on Friday by British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on the freshly raked sand of Carbis Bay for their first gathering since 2019. Last year's gathering was canceled because of COVID-19, and recovery from the pandemic is dominating this year's discussions, with members of the wealthy democracies' club expected to commit to sharing at least 1 billion vaccine shots with struggling countries. China also loomed large over the meeting on the craggy coast of Cornwall. Biden's proposed critique of China's labour practices was to be raised as the allies unveil an infrastructure proposal dubbed "Build Back Better for the World," a name that echoes the slogan of the American president's election campaign. The plan calls for spending hundreds of millions of dollars in collaboration with the private sector. It's designed to compete with China's trillion-dollar "Belt and Road Initiative," which has launched a network of projects and maritime lanes that already snake around large portions of the world, primarily Asia and Africa. Critics say the projects often create massive debt and expose nations to undue influence by Beijing. Not every European power has viewed China in as harsh a light as Biden, who has painted the rivalry with the techno-security state as the defining competition for the 21st century. But there are signs that Europe is willing to put greater scrutiny on Beijing. Weeks before Biden took office last year, the European Commission announced it had come to terms with Beijing on the Comprehensive Agreement on Investment, a deal meant to provide Europe and China greater access to each other's markets. The Biden administration had hoped to have consultations on the pact. But the deal has been put on hold, and the European Union in March announced sanctions targeting four Chinese officials involved with human rights abuses in Xinjiang. Beijing, in turn, responded by imposing sanctions on several members of the European Parliament and other Europeans critical of the Chinese Communist Party. Biden administration officials see the moment as an opportunity to take concrete action to speak out against China's reliance on forced labor as an "affront to human dignity." While calling out China in the communique wouldn't create any immediate penalties for Beijing, one senior administration official said the action was meant to send a message that the G-7 was serious about defending human rights and working together to eradicate the use of forced labor. An estimated 1 million people or more - most of them Uyghurs - have been confined in reeducation camps in China's western Xinjiang region in recent years, according to researchers. Chinese authorities have been accused of imposing forced labor, systematic forced birth control, torture and separating children from incarcerated parents. Beijing rejects allegations that it is committing crimes. Opening three days of talks in southwest England, Johnson on Friday warned that world leaders must not repeat errors made over the past 18 months - or those made during the recovery from the 2008 global financial crisis. "It is vital that we don't repeat the mistake of the last great crisis, the last great economic recession in 2008, when the recovery was not uniform across all parts of society," he said after leaders posed for a "family photo" by the sea. "And I think what's gone wrong with this pandemic, and what risks being a lasting scar, is that I think the inequalities may be entrenched," Johnson added. The leaders of the G-7 - which also includes Canada, France, Germany, Italy and Japan - hope the meeting at the seaside resort will energize the global economy. As Johnson led the politicians off the beach, French President Emmanuel Macron threw his arm around the shoulders of Biden, whom he was meeting for the first time. The two men will have more formal talks on Saturday, a meeting between allies who recalibrated their relationship during the four years of President Donald Trump's "America first" foreign policy. Macron's preference for multilateralism was out of step with Trump's isolationist tendencies. But the Trump era was often framed by Macron as a clarifying moment - one in which Europe had to step forward as America drifted away from alliances and toward Trumpism.
Categories: Business News

Pfizer, AZ… or both? Mixing may help against Covid

June 12, 2021 - 2:24pm
At the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, it was unclear whether researchers would be able to create a single working vaccine, which makes it all the more surprising that the latest immunization dilemma arises from having multiple vaccine options.Because of unpredictable supply and some concerns about an exceedingly rare but serious clotting risk from the AstraZeneca vaccine, public health officials in some parts of the world that have relied heavily on that shot have recently issued new guidance on mixing and matching different Covid-19 vaccines.Recently, for example, Canada’s National Advisory Committee on Immunization updated its guidance to say that people who received the AstraZeneca vaccine as their first dose can receive that same vaccine as their second dose or get a follow-up shot of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna instead. The committee also said that it was possible to receive the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines interchangeably as first and second doses. Countries ranging from France to Finland to China to Bahrain have also outlined possible scenarios for combining different vaccines. Even the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has interim guidance saying this is acceptable in “exceptional situations,” such as if the same vaccine is not available.While this guidance may seem confusing, especially when the initial vaccine guidance told people to get the same shot for both doses, it does provide an opportunity to understand the safety of using mismatched vaccines, and to measure whether mismatched vaccines offer any advantage.One recent small and not yet peer-reviewed study of 26 people who received the AstraZeneca shot followed by one from Pfizer-BioNTech suggested, based on blood tests, that those with mismatched vaccines had at least as strong an immune response as people who got both Pfizer shots. The National Institutes of Health recently began a clinical trial that will examine the effects of different combinations of Covid-19 vaccines.In Britain, a trial of this kind is already underway for the AstraZeneca and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines, and the scientists behind it have released early data on side effects. They found more reports of feverishness, chills, fatigue and headache among people who received a dose that was different from their original shot compared with people who received identical shots. Scientists want to know whether that indicates that the immune system was more stimulated by the different vaccine, and could develop added protection. It’s still too soon to say, but more results from the trial are expected this month.This is not the first time scientists have investigated what seems like an unconventional way of vaccine dosing, and it’s not necessarily something to fear. It may be our best hope against certain pathogens.In the last two decades, as new vaccine technologies have emerged, the idea of using different kinds of vaccines against the same pathogen has gained momentum. The approach — known among scientists as “heterologous prime-boost” — has been explored in rodent experiments to develop vaccines against Ebola (now authorized for use by European regulators), tuberculosis and even cancers associated with the Epstein-Barr virus. Mouse experiments of this approach have even been tested for other coronaviruses in the past, such as the original SARS virus and the coronavirus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome.More recently, in March 2021, scientists in China published a study in mice that looked at different combinations of four different kinds of Covid-19 vaccines, including one made from mRNA and one viral vector vaccine, which — like the AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccines — uses an inactivated cold virus to trigger an immune response to Covid.Why mix-and-match at all? Part of the thinking among scientists is that by administering different vaccines that expose the immune system to different parts of a pathogen, one after the other, the body becomes trained to recognize different parts of the invader and becomes more effective at defending against it.Another line of reasoning is that using different kinds of vaccines jump-starts different elements of the immune system. Viral vector vaccines, for example, are well-equipped to stimulate a part of the immune response that helps generate an army of what are called “killer T cells” to protect the body against an invading virus. Other kinds of vaccines are thought to skew more heavily toward prompting the creation of antibodies to combat the virus. Both immune system responses are helpful, and scientists’ theory is that combining them could be more potent than either of them alone.One area where the mix-and-match approach stirs the most hope is in the fight against H.I.V., where vaccine researchers have been investigating it for decades. In what might have been the first human trial of this method, the immunologist Dr. Daniel Zagury of the Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris received two different experimental H.I.V. shots in 1987. First, a version of a virus that was engineered to produce an H.I.V. protein in the body, and later booster shots of the protein directly (rather than the engineered virus). Dr. Zagury and his colleagues reported that his immune system showed signs of responding, including producing antibodies.Although attempts at making a successful H.I.V. vaccine have faltered since then, there is still enthusiasm for the mix-and-match approach. A trial called RV144, done more than a decade ago, followed the mix-and-match approach and was the only H.IV. vaccine trial to ever show protection against the virus among a handful of other experimental H.I.V. vaccines. More trials of this kind are underway, and the hope is that finding the right pairing of vaccines will prove successful.It’s clear that many Covid-19 vaccines are mightily effective on their own and don’t need to be paired with other versions. But scientists should keep a close eye on the results of the mix-and-match trials underway to see if large, well-controlled studies show any signal of better protection.The findings could inform vaccine development for other pathogens. This is especially true for viruses that mutate even more rapidly than SARS-CoV-2, like H.I.V. In an era of multiplying vaccine technologies, it might be the case that vaccines, like people, prove more effective when they work together.
Categories: Business News

What led to the dominance of delta variant?

June 12, 2021 - 2:24pm
The delta coronavirus variant, which was first detected in India, is now the dominant variant in the UK.Some experts warn that the delta variant may be 100 per cent more transmissible than the previously dominant variant, alpha. But we don't think that transmissibility alone explains delta's dominance.Successful variants often have a biological advantage – through mutation – that helps them spread more easily among the population. And it's the variants with these mutations that natural selection acts on, ensuring they out-compete other, less transmissible strains.The delta variant may, however, have a more complicated relationship with people than those that came before it. It is even possible that it was government policies, rather than the variant's inherent increased transmissibility, that led to its success and dominance in the UK.To illustrate why, it's helpful to distinguish between several powerful forces that propel evolutionary change.The first, natural selection, occurs when one type of organism out-competes another — either within or between species — leading, over time, to the success of one and the demise of the other.An example might be when one cheetah, slightly faster than another, outruns its rival and is thereby better able to catch prey, survive and reproduce. The slower cheetah is out of luck. It may either not find enough food to survive or be unable to attract a mate, both of which would prevent its successful reproduction.The second force, artificial selection, is a subset of natural selection. It involves a person intentionally choosing which organisms survive and multiply.An example of this is a horse breeder. Horses that have desired qualities — speed and submissiveness, for example — are allowed by the breeder to mate with others, raising the odds that the next generation of horses will have the same qualities.A third, less well–known force called unconscious selection, is where human interactions with the environment have accidental evolutionary effects. This further subset of natural selection is an important force across the world and is becoming increasingly important as populations grow and people change the global environment.Antibiotic resistance, where bacteria evolve defences against modern medicines, is a good example. As we continue to prescribe antibiotics to kill bacteria, we unconsciously select for bacteria resistant to our treatments.Another example is how farming practices have been implicated in how diseases spread among plants. The way people clump trees together may help diseases spread more effectively. Some researchers even argue that the 2009 swine flu outbreak, and possibly even the COVID-19 pandemic, occurred for similar reasons.The way we arrange our world – planting trees too close to each other or delaying vaccine shots, say – selects for changes in our world. And many of these changes, such as antibiotic-resistant “superbugs” or scary new variants – can be harmful to us.The forces driving deltaReturning to the delta variant, its ability to infect people who are partly vaccinated against it may explain its rise to dominance. While people who have received two doses of the Pfizer vaccine may have around 88 per cent protection, this figure is as low as 33.5 per cent with one dose of either the Pfizer or AstraZeneca vaccine, according to Public Health England.Viewed from the perspective of evolutionary selection, it seems that the UK government's decision to lengthen the period between first and second vaccine doses provided delta with an extra window to infect people. While delta is likely to have evolved in India through natural selection, unconscious selection may have ensured its survival in the UK.It is possible that other factors, including the crowded living conditions of Bolton — the town in north-west England where the delta variant first became widespread — as well as its higher transmissibility, were responsible for its success. And the government's decision, even if it did contribute to the variant's dominance, may not have been the wrong one: hospitalisations and deaths appear to be lower, even as cases drastically rise.What is important, however, is to think about the implications of the artificial selection hypothesis – if it is true.Rather than making blanket claims about the overall transmissibility of different variants as they arise, it will become increasingly important, particularly as different parts of the world are vaccinated at different rates, to think about the way different variants — which have been selected, naturally or unconsciously — will interact with new populations as they spread.The US, for example, has focused on providing two doses in a shorter timeframe. And assuming that because the delta variant has been successful in the UK it will create the same problems in the US, is not necessarily justified: selection is likely to have different effects in the two populations.More broadly, this evolutionary perspective suggests that we need to look to selection, however it takes place, to make better predictions about which variant features are likely to lead to success in different populations. Uniting evolutionary theory with population health sciences is likely to be essential for improving our responses to disease, now and in the future. (This article is syndicated by PTI from The Conversation)
Categories: Business News

OPEC sees strong oil demand recovery: Paul Hickin, S&P

June 12, 2021 - 2:24pm
For the next couple of months, we would like to see oil prices at 70 dollars a barrel as a support and it might creep higher oil prices over that time, but that is the level which starts to trigger OPEC plus group back on to the market, says Paul Hickin, Associate Director-Oil, S&P.ET Now: We are seeing oil at a multiyear high given the fact that we are seeing a rapid pace of vaccination that is stoking hopes of a recovery kicking in, how do you see oil prices faring in the next couple months, it is obviously going to be a concern for India but for the rest of the world as we are seeing demand picking up, how do you see oil prices?I think 70 dollars a barrel is the support level now for oil for a while, there is demand optimism even while this third wave and some problems with lockdowns and recoveries, it is not completely even but still there is demand recovery and we see with the EIA report today looking at 100 million barrels oil back in 2022. It has returned to pre Covid levels of demand which is really stoking the market’s optimism. Although, with one caveat, I would say--for the next couple of months we would like to see 70 dollars a barrel as a support and it might creep higher oil prices over that time but that is the level which starts to trigger OPEC plus group back on to the market and they have been very cautious of late, been very slow to bring on crude back on market, given that those demand concerns but you are going to see in the second half of the year a lot more OPEC plus crude coming back on to the market potentially a lot of Iran crude as well. Even at those oil prices, you might start seeing shale as well revive, it has been in a little bit of a doldrums, a little bit sleepwalking at the moment, but you could see shale as well revive in the last quarter of the year. ET Now: We did see a lot of supply discipline coming in by the OPEC plus but once OPEC starts putting in more oil in the market, there is of course oil coming in from Iran as well, how do you think that is going to affect prices in the long term?Yes, and it is going to put downward trend for oil prices --that extra crude is going to start plug in the gap and compliance has been very good, but OPEC plus has kept a lot of discipline for a long-long time now, it has been waiting for this light at the end of the tunnel and now it starts seeing that has emerged finally after a huge discipline last year especially, and you are going to see compliance waning and you could see it being back pump-at-will some point-- if that demand recovery continues and that will continue to plug the gap and keep the market on an even queue.
Categories: Business News

Ralph Wanger's tips on how to make money in smallcap stocks

June 12, 2021 - 2:24pm
Legendary asset manager Ralph Wanger says smallcap companies often offer unexplored and under-exploited investment opportunities, because full-time investors tend to focus elsewhere for greater returns.However, investing in smallcap companies can be riskier than largecaps and, therefore, Wanger advises investors to perform a careful research before trying to spot established firms with an able management that have proven their abilities over time.A sound balance sheet and a strong position in their industry is also an added advantage that investors can look for in a firm.“I have a sort of ecological theory to explain the phenomenon of higher return from small companies. In any environment, some creatures are going to be more successful at adapting than others, and those are the ones that will thrive and prosper. In a tough, competitive business environment, new companies would struggle to survive by funding and exploiting their own special niche. Most fail, but the few that make it win big. The reason they make it is that the environment must be favourable. Often the big growth stocks reached their heights because they were boosted by some particular development at that time. Ecological changes create great opportunities for investors who understand them. Most investment gains are made during the development phase and not afterwards,” he said in the book A Zebra in Lion Country: Ralph Wanger’s Investment Survival Guide.Ralph Wanger is the founder of Wanger Asset Management and the former manager of the Acorn Fund. His investing style of holding small companies with financial strength for long allowed him to generate annualised returns of 16.3% with the Acorn Fund between 1970 and 2003.He also authored one of the most famous investment books A Zebra in Lion Country, in which he compares portfolio managers to Zebras, who stay in herds, look alike, think alike and stick close together and often have difficult-to-achieve goals.Why are portfolio managers like zebrasExplaining his theory, Wanger says for portfolio managers the goal is above-average performance, and for zebras, it is to eat fresh grass.He feels both portfolio managers and zebras dislike risk, as the former can get fired and latter can get eaten by lions. “If you are a zebra and live in a herd, the key decision you have to make is where to stand in relation to the rest of the herd. When you think the conditions are safe, the outside of the herd is the best. For, there the grass is fresh, while those in the middle see only grass that is half-eaten or trampled down. The aggressive zebras, on the outside of the herd, eat much better,” he says.Wanger says there comes a time when the investment climate is not conducive for portfolio managers to make investment, and they have to weather the market storm just as a zebra has to survive when lions approach.He feels the smart portfolio managers know how to react in troubled times, just as the smart zebra outside knows when the lions are approaching: they prudently move inside while the lions are around.He believes the smart outside zebra knows there's no point in becoming a lion's lunch and they change their strategy to survive the lion attack and then move back to become an outside zebra - in search of more fresh grass when the lions go away.Why Wanger prefers small companies for investment He believes smaller companies can provide higher returns over long periods, as they have more room to grow. Also, he feels no company can sustain a high growth rate forever, and eventually its size would weigh it down.Wanger says there are a number of triggers that can boost the prices of smallcap stocks. They include- Earnings growth Acquisition by a larger company at an above-market price Stock repurchases by the company, Increase in the price the market is willing to pay for earnings due to increased institutional interest.Wanger offers a glimpse into his own investment approach in the book, which offers timeless lessons for young investors wanting to make it big in the investing. Let's look at some of his priceless tips-Go for boring businesses with good management Wanger says a dull business run by good management is far better than a glamorous business managed by a mediocre management. He feels investors should include a stock in their portfolio if it has growth potential, financial strength and fundamental value. Also, the company should have a simple business model, reliable sales and profit growth, ideally through an entrepreneurial management dominating a boring but profitable niche market.Wanger feels a low debt level is another qualifying criteria that investors should consider before investing in a stock, as the impact of large debt is more pronounced in a smallcap firm.2) Spot a major long-term trend.Wanger says if investors are looking for a great investment for 5 years or more, they should identify a long-term trend that will give a particular company some sort of edge. He feels investors should look for the next major trend and then attempt to spot companies that will benefit from it.He says if investors concentrate on smaller companies, they might have a better chance of catching the next trend.“If you’re looking for a home run – a great investment for five or 10 years or more – then the only way to beat this enormous fog that covers the future is to identify a long-term trend that will give a particular business some edge. Invest in themes that will give a company a long-term franchise," he says.Revealing his philosophy, Wanger says he identifies social, economic and technological trends that he feels would last longer than a business cycle. Also, he avoids focusing on shorter-term predictions, as most of the information is available to everyone, which makes it difficult to outsmart competition.How to identify a major trend?Wanger says to identify trends, investors must develop an observant mindset that can draw generalisations from many different particulars. He says trends can best be spotted from reading and one’s everyday general experience, including the work environment. "You have to train yourself to make generalisations from random particulars to keep asking yourself ‘what does it mean’,” he says.Write down your investing thesisAn investment philosophy plays an important role in keeping investors on the right track. Wanger says one should write down why she is buying a stock every time she does so. "Spell out your buy decision clearly, not ambiguously. Keep it short – no more than a paragraph or two. And when the reason you bought the stock is no longer true, sell it. In this way, your sell strategy is built into your buy decision," says he.Wanger believes an investing thesis can save investors a lot of sleepless nights, costly transaction costs and wild price fluctuations that haunt most investors. He says successful investors always have a strategy and a different way of looking at stocks. They have a philosophy that dictates what kind of stocks they want to own and they stick to their conviction. “Develop a set of convictions you adhere to. You can turn your back on thousands of stocks and concentrate on a manageable universe. A set of guidelines – and I urge you to put them down on paper – gives you confidence when times are rough. It helps you make the toughest decisions: when to sell. But it has to be Your Strategy, what’s right for you. Every singer must sing her own song,” he says.Aim for multibaggers Wanger says it’s exceptionally difficult to find a world- class management team with a truly great or unique product. So once investors find a company that satisfies these conditions, it's important to hold them for the long term. “I always thought to be a good investor, you need to hit a lot of singles and not strike out often. I was wrong. Investing, especially in small companies, is a home-run-hitter’s game. When people ask me how we have managed to get our results, I tell them that it’s not by avoiding disasters, because I have had my share of them. That’s understood with smallcap investing. But if you manage to own some stocks that go up 10 times, that pays for a lot of the disasters, with profits left over,” he says.Hold on to stocks for long termWanger says investors can't make 10 or 20 times their money if they don’t hold on to stocks. “Most people are delighted when a stock doubles, and quickly sell to lock in their gain. If a company is still performing, let its stock, too, continue to perform," he says.Focus on limited themesWanger says rather than building a broadly diversified stock portfolio, it is better to determine a limited number of themes that will be played out over the next several years and then identify a group of stocks that reflect those themes. “My portfolio may comprise a considerable number of stocks, but most of them by far will fall into half-dozen or fewer themes," says he.Give winners time to compound Wanger says in the short term, even the best of smallcap stocks are subject to a lot of ups and downs and the worst decision investors can make is to sell a solid company just because the price went down. He feels one needs to hold solid companies for a long time so that the gains can compound. He says the average holding period of a stock should be between four and five years and some winners can be held on for decades. “In life, 99% of what we do can be classified as laundry – stuff that has to be done, but you don’t do it better than anybody else, and it’s not worth much. Once in a while, though, you do something that changes your life dramatically like you buy a stock that goes up 20-fold. These rare events dominate,” says he.Don’t get classified as a growth or value investorWanger says investors should avoid getting classified as a pure value investor or a pure growth investor. “There is no reason to be a pure this or pure that. I look for – growth at a reasonable price. I want good growing companies, but I don’t want to overpay," he says.He says growth itself is one component of value and a growing stream of earnings is certainly worth more than a static stream of earnings. "You could even say that growth generates value. It can disappear as growth slows, but so can any other part of the value equation. A low PE can disappear, if earnings shrink. So can a low PB ratio," he says.Wanger says investors do seem to be born with the fondness for one style or the other based on their personalities. One should pursue a style that fits her temperament, otherwise she won’t be happy.“Show me an unhappy investor and I will show you an unsuccessful investor. The value investor is hitting for singles. He will be delighted if he doubles his money in a couple of years. Few value ideas pay off better than that. If his analysis is correct and the company is worth more than the market recognises, however, the downside is limited. The growth investor is going for home runs. He dreams of making 5-10 times his investment. And his downside is considerable, since high-multiple stocks can become average-multiple stocks at the drop of a penny in expected earnings. You never know for sure if a company’s going to do what you hope it will," he says.Diversify your portfolioWanger says no matter how careful and selective one are, things can still go wrong in investing. “You should own at least a dozen stocks if they are smallcap, so a couple of winners can offset a couple of duds," he says.Do not overpayWanger says investors may be very fond of a company but they shouldn't overpay for it. He feels the stock must be reasonably priced in connection to earnings and cash flow in order for investors to buy the stock. HE says looking at numbers such as earnings growth and price multiples is less useful while evaluating small companies, as they have a shorter operating history and undergo changes quite often.Wanger is respected in the investment circle for his outstanding long-term performance. His courage to stand against the herd at the right times and his ability to adapt to changes has helped him become a deserved part of the elite group of The World’s 99 Greatest Investors. (Disclaimer: This article is based on Ralph Wanger's book “A Zebra in Lion Country: Ralph Wanger’s Investment Survival Guide.”)
Categories: Business News

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